Blog
February 10, 2022

Forget what you know about prescriptions.

Who you know can save you time and money

Sound familiar?

Your doctor’s office phones your prescription into the pharmacy of your choice. At the pharmacy, you wait the average 45 minutes to get your medication, present your insurance card, pay your copay and head home. 

Pretty smooth, right? It’s what you know. In fact, it’s the same experience for just about anyone who has ever needed to fill a prescription. 

But you may be surprised to learn that what you know could be costing you time and money. 

Are you overpaying?

Consider the fact that a 2018 study from the University of Southern California found that patients overpaid for prescription meds 23% of the time. The overpayments are the result of something industry types call “clawbacks.” It's what happens when your insurance copay amount is higher than the cost of the drug had you paid cash. That study is a few years old, however, the state of Ohio announced a new probe into the practice of clawbacks as late as December of last year. 

Or consider an experiment, also from 2018, in which Consumer Reports sent secret shoppers into 150 different pharmacies to buy 5 commonly prescribed drugs. They found that the total price for all 5 medications ranged from about $107 at independent pharmacies to a whopping $928 at a leading pharmacy chain. 

Shop around, they said

Consumer Reports’ advice to readers? Shop around.

But how do you do that? 

Remember, your prescription has been called into a pharmacy by your doctor. If you don’t like the price at that pharmacy, then what? How many pharmacies do you have to visit, with your prescription in hand? With so much price variance in the marketplace, how do you know when you’ve found the lowest price available? 

In healthcare, the shop around advice has been in vogue for awhile now. In fact, every February is National Wise Healthcare Consumer Month. The basic idea is that consumers–not experts, such as policy makers, insurance companies, drug makers or healthcare systems, to name a few–should be able to control healthcare costs. But if the experts can’t rein in runaway prices, how can the average American?

If shop around is the best advice from people in the know, maybe it’s time to know someone new.

Get to know Gifthealth

You can spend your time shopping around to save money or you can save time by spending your money at the nearest pharmacy and hope that you’re not spending too much. What we know so far in a nutshell is that you may be able to save money or you can save time, but you likely can’t do both.  

Or can you? 

The answer isn’t in what you know, but who you know. 

Gifthealth has built a technology platform that solves the savings dilemma–for both time and money–when it comes to filling your prescriptions. 

If your eyes glazed over at “technology platform”, it’s not what you think. There is no app to tap, portal to log into or password to forget. We call it zero touch technology. It works like this:

Step 1: You have your doctor send your prescription to Gifthealth.

Step 2: Our platform automatically, 

  • Determines lowest payment option from our network of independent pharmacies,
  • Applies all available coupons or discounts, 
  • Works with any insurance to maximize your pharmacy benefit. 

Step 3: Expect a call from our team to verify details of your FREE delivery and to collect your copay if applicable. 

Step 4: Sit back and relax–your meds are on the way to your home, wherever you call home.

It’s really that simple. We believe the best technology is the one you never have to use–because it does everything for you automatically.

The bottom line, for your bottom line.

You could overpay for your meds 23% of the time. You could shop around. Or you could get the lowest possible price EVERY time–and get your prescriptions delivered FREE–all without lifting a finger, much less making a trip to the pharmacy. 

See how we can help the next time you need to fill a prescription. Already taking a medication? We can help you save on your refills, too. All it takes is a simple text.  

Recent Articles